Top
shortDrives.com
Favorites
Menu
Close

Enter Destination
Select State
arrow
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont
Select City
arrow
No City
Filter

Attractions Nearby

New Castle, New Hampshire
“Edit”
Amusement
Amusement
Aquarium
Aquarium
Beach
Beach
Bowling
Bowling
Casino
Casino
Golf
Golf
Historic
Historic
Lighthouse
Lighthouse
Mountain
Mountain
Museum
Museum
Space
Space
Vineyard
Vineyard
Water Park
Water Park
Zoo
Zoo
Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse image
(Range: < 1 mile)
Portsmouth Harbor Light — also known locally as Fort Point Light — is the only mainland lighthouse on New Hampshire’s 18-mile seacoast. It can also be viewed from tour boats leaving Portsmouth. (Curated content from www.portsmouthharborlighthouse.org)
Fort Stark Historic Site image
New Castle, NH
(Range: < 1 mile)
Fort Stark Historic Site is located on a peninsula historically called Jerry's Point on the southeast corner of New Castle Island. It overlooks the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. Fort Stark was named in honor of John Stark, commander of N.H. forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777). An unmarked walking trail traverses the ten-acre fort site. (Curated content from www.nhstateparks.org)
Fort McClary State Historic Site image
(Range: < 1 mile)
For more than 275 years, a fort has stood to protect the approaches to the Piscataqua River at the southern gateway to Kittery, Maine. The most recent of these is Fort McClary, named for New Hampshire native Major Andrew McClary who died at the Revolutionary War's Battle of Bunker Hill. Fort McClary stands today as one of the state's most important historic forts that dramatically preserves evidence of military history and changes in military architecture and technology.  (Curated content from apps.web.maine.gov)
Children's Museum of New Hampshire image
(Range: 1 mile)
Our Mission: Actively engage families in hands-on discovery. Our Vision: To inspire all to become the next generation of innovators and creative thinkers (Curated content from childrens-museum.org)
Warner House image
(Range: 1 mile)
The earliest, urban brick house in northern New England, the Warner House is considered a fine example of early-Georgian architecture with its sumptuous moldings and richly-paneled interiors.  (Curated content from www.warnerhouse.org)
Strawbery Banke Museum image
(Range: 1 mile)
Strawbery Banke Museum, in the heart of historic downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is an authentic nearly 10-acre outdoor history museum dedicated to bringing 300+ years of American history in the same waterfront neighborhood to life.  (Curated content from www.strawberybanke.org)
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion image
(Range: 1 mile)
The Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion is an 18th-century house and farm site located on the banks of Little Harbor in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. In 1753 NH’s first Royal Governor, Benning Wentworth (1696-1767; Governor 1741-1767), moved the seat of government and his extended household to the site. The property became the center of political and social life in the colony. The Mansion is historically significant as the only original surviving residence of a Royal Governor in the United States. (Curated content from wentworthcoolidge.org)
Whaleback Light image
(Range: 1 mile)
In 1869, storms had caused cracks in the tower and foundation causing the decision to build a new tower in 1872. The new tower, still standing today, was built with dovetailed granite blocks alongside the original tower, which was removed in 1880. The light is 59 feet (18 m) above mean sea level, and the tower, also housed the keeper's living quarters and a storage area. (Curated content from en.wikipedia.org)
Prescott Park image
(Range: 1 mile)
Prescott Park was created and has been maintained by the terms of the last will and testament of Josie F. Prescott, a life long resident of the City of Portsmouth. It was her wish that a public park, free and accessible to all, be established along the Portsmouth waterfront replacing what had become a run down industrial area of Portsmouth. (Curated content from www.cityofportsmouth.com)
Jackson House image
(Range: 2 miles)
A National Historic Landmark, Jackson House is the oldest surviving wood-frame house in New Hampshire. It was built by Richard Jackson, a woodworker, farmer, and mariner. It resembles English post-Medieval prototypes, but is notably American in its extravagant use of wood. Succeeding generations added a lean-to by 1715, along with more additions in the 1700s and 1800s to accommodate different family groups sharing the house at once. (Curated content from www.historicnewengland.org)